HOARDER HOUSE FIRES

Saturday Oct 15

Time: 10:30am-Noon

48 Student Max

Timothy Klett - FDNY

Fires in Hoarder houses can present a multitude of problems on the fire ground, from access and egress, water application to the eventual searches for possible victims. This lecture will discuss the common, and more over, the uncommon signs indicating the possible presence of hoarding conditions. It will cover the initial operations such as when encountering the 3 main types of conditions we can expect to find and, also how to manage each condition individually. This lecture will also list some of the serious dangers these fires represent to firefighters operating in and around areas with hoarding conditions, and how to effectively do our jobs while safely evaluating each problem. We will also cover the information chain, which is critical for the incident commander to constantly monitor the progress or lack of, there-by requiring an immediate change in tactics.

OVERWHELMING THE HIGH-RISE FIRE: SUCCESS WITH THE BIG LINE

Saturday Oct 15

Time: 10:30am-Noon

40 Student Max

Dave McGrail - Denver Fire Department

The central theme of this training program focuses on the use of 2½-inch attack hose-line, operated from a standpipe system, to combat a fire in a high-rise and or multi-story low-rise standpipe equipped building.  High-rise firefighting using standpipe operations is exponentially more complicated and dangerous than most other fireground operations. From a room-and-contents apartment fire in a residential high-rise, to the well-involved fire floor in a commercial high-rise building, to the ever-present threat of a terrorist attack--- you must be prepared!  

 

This program separates fact from fiction and provides user-friendly procedures and techniques to combat any high-rise fire with a very powerful and appropriate weapon.  Because of the critical factors of modern fuel loads, low standpipe system pressure, wind, and reflex time, the fire flow needed to quickly control a high-rise fire and manage the risk to our personnel, is of critical importance. The recommended attack hose-line for high-rise firefights and standpipe operations is the 2½-inch attack hose-line. The overall mindset and facts supporting this weapon will be fully explained so that attendees will leave with vital information to support “change” or help with implementation in your corner of the fire service.  In addition, Chief Dave McGrail will discuss the option of a “Hybrid Stretch” using 2½-inch hose with a 2-inch nozzle section.  This is a viable and appropriate weapon in many situations. 

URBAN FORCIBLE ENTRY

Saturday Oct 15

Time: 10:30am-Noon

40 Student Max

Robert James & Kody Schrum- Capitol Fire Training

Forcible entry tools and tactics have been around for ages. The need for keeping up with the ever so-changing game of forcing our way through things on the street is changing on us fast, and we have to be prepared. This interactive, forcible entry program is designed to teach the firefighter no matter the level of experience the main, basic and advanced principles of street smart forcible entry. This program focuses on new and older, but yet safe, street approved methods and techniques for conventional forcible entry tactics.

 

During this time we will discuss and show techniques for making entry through and around locks, for both residential and commercial structures. Students will also learn quick access into urban steel roll gates and how to defeat the locks and locking mechanisms for them. Overcoming street hatches, additional security features like drop bars, slide bolts, burglar bars and modified locks will be covered as well. Because this class is an interactive class, students will be faced with forcible entry scenarios and explain how they would overcome the challenges as well. Because no class ends on skills, students will complete the class with complex forcible entry scenarios that they will have to work through as teams.

COORDINATING VENTILATION: SUPPORTING EXTINGUISHMENT AND SURVIVABILITY

Saturday Oct 15

Time: 10:30am-Noon

40 Student Max

Nick Papa - New Britain Fire Department

Ventilation can make or break the outcome of a fire. Successful execution requires the knowledge of how it works and the precautions that must be taken. This class examines ventilation and its relationship with fire behavior, fireground operations, and victim survivability.

The common pitfalls and misconceptions are addressed to reduce potential errors and avoidable losses. A set of guiding principles and practices, serving as a universal framework, is provided to streamline decision-making, improve performance, and produce better outcomes.

This class provides a functional understanding of ventilation and its methodology. With this mental skill-set, you can determine how to leverage the full potential of ventilation and maximize its benefits so, you make the right call for your fireground.

HANDLING SWING STAGE SCAFFOLDING EMERGENCIES

Saturday Oct 15

Time: 3:00pm-4:45pm

40 Student Max

Mike Giroux - Yonkers Fire Department

 

Swing stage scaffolding has become more prevalent in the urban environment because taller buildings need to be maintained, cleaned and worked on from the exterior.  This class will look at every component of the swing stage scaffold, which includes guidelines, rules, and regulations for these temporary systems.  We will also discuss how to size up and initiate our IAP when we are called to an emergency of this nature.  In addition, we will also look at how to rescue these individuals from their fall protection harnesses or from the scaffold itself in a safe and efficient manner.  By the end of the class, the students will be able to explain how all the components of swing stage interact with each other, perform a size-up and initiate an IAP, and lastly be able to explain how to perform the rescue safely

PREPARING FOR THE COMMERCIAL FIREGROUND

Saturday Oct 15

Time: 3:00pm-4:45pm

40 Student Max

Aaron Heller - On Scene Training Associates LLC

Commercial buildings pose far more complex hazards than the typical 1 & 2 family dwellings we commonly encounter. This class provides personnel with real-life hazards faced by firefighters along with proven strategies & tactics to overcome these issues. Special concerns for Big Box Stores, local shops and taxpayers, warehouses, industrial facilities, and office complexes are addressed. 
 

COMMAND AND CONTROL OF HIGH-RISE FIRES

Saturday Oct 15

Time: 3:00pm-4:45pm

40 Student Max

David McGrail - Denver Fire Department

In this training program, Chief Dave McGrail will outline the six critical areas of Command and Control at Fires in High-Rise Buildings. This will include the overall Strategic Level Components and specific geographical areas of responsibility.  From here, Chief McGrail will illustrate where the Tactical Level Components are placed into the operation, based on the highest priorities.  This will include Engine Co. and Truck Co. Operations.  Lastly, Chief McGrail will narrow the focus and illustrate real Task Level Procedures that must be completed.  

 

Chief McGrail will include case studies of both residential and commercial high-rise fires where he was the incident commander.  This will include a discussion of the lessons learned and reinforced from these operations. Attendees will leave with a comprehensive, “Big Picture” understanding of the overall high-rise fireground operation.  It is essential for all Incident commanders to understand all levels of the operation, in order to successfully choreograph and lead the battle.

THE ANATOMY OF A RESCUE: THE DISSECTION OF TWO VES RESCUES

Saturday Oct 15

Time: 3:00pm-4:45pm

48 Student Max

David Stone/Shannon Stone - Ft. Walton Beach, FL

Anatomy of a rescue is about preparing and setting your firefighters up for success when it counts. This class covers a variety of topics from culture to leadership, but it’s main focus is reviewing two documented video-recorded successful vent-enter-search (VES) rescues in Fort Walton Beach Florida. 

 

Both incidents are shared from the perspective of a Captain making a rescue and the Battalion Chief commanding a rescue. Both are shared incidents from two brothers who worked on the same fire department on different shifts. Both incidents are discussed in depth covering tactics and strategies from the Officer and Battalion Chief. 

 

These incidents were not successful because of luck, but were successful because of a culture of proactive training and preparation. 

 

We will review both incidents and talk about the preparation, practice and the commonalities that contribute to success on the fireground. We will cover victim survivability and specific tactical effectiveness of how water application created survivable space and how strong command leads to successful outcomes on the fire-ground.