READING SMOKE 

Friday Oct 15

Time: 10:30am-Noon

48 Student Max

Providence DAC Kevin Jutras

Reading smoke has been and will continue to be an important component of a proper fire ground size up. This break out session will present the need for developing the skill of reading smoke, present the concept of reading smoke and examine the components of smoke that are necessary to successfully read smoke. This break out session is intended for veteran to rookie fire service members.  

LEADING YOUR PEERS WITH AN ENHANCED UNDERSTANDING OF HUMAN PERFORMANCE UNDER STRESS

Friday Oct 15

Time: 10:30am-Noon

48 Student Max

FDNY FF Jim McNamara - Leadership Under Fire

The senior man has always been one of the most important positions in fire service. The senior firefighter is charged with responsibilities that range from teaching the young, to instilling the values of the unit and passing along the knowledge and history of those that served before. In a fire service of ever-increasing responsibility both in span and scope, the senior firefighter’s role has never been more challenging or important.  In order for a senior firefighter to execute his responsibilities, he must have a more complete understanding of the internal and external “human factors” forces that impact every aspect of his role.  

 

This dynamic presentation provides senior (and emerging) firefighters with a comprehensive framework that is responsive to the responsibilities of the senior firefighter and thoughtfully consider the inherent political, legal, and social challenges in today’s environment.  The conversation blends anecdotal and scientific evidence to foster a greater of understanding of the physiological, psychological, and tactical forces on the modern firefighter in order to allow the senior firefighter to execute his critical mission of developing his junior firefighters, mold newly promoted officers, and enhance the operationally capability set of his unit at fires and emergencies.

BIG TRUCK; SMALL CREW 

Friday Oct 15

Time: 10:30am-Noon

48 Student Max

On Scene Training Associates

This original course developed by Lt. Dave Gallagher and Firefighter Bob Swick is an interactive presentation which provides the firefighter and officer with a wide variety of strategies and tactics when assigned to an understaffed truck company. Topics include portable ladders, search techniques, ventilation, forcible entry, and operating within the Incident Command System. Although we certainly do not advocate short-staffing, we know it is a reality in many departments.

EMOTIONS AND BEHAVIORS: UNDERSTANDING THE US FIREFIGHTER FATALITY PROBLEM

Friday Oct 15

Time: 10:30am-Noon

48 Student Max

Providence BC Joe Molis

A look at the current state of firefighter fatality statistics to understand the causes of firefighter deaths.  The presentation will examine the different studies and explain the methodologies behind the numbers. It will also take an historical look at deaths and identify changes in technology, standards, behavior that have reduced the number of firefighters being killed over the last 40 years. Finally, the presentation will talk about emerging issues facing firefighters in the future and provide a glimpse into the current projects addressing health and safety.

THERMAL IMAGERS - DO YOU REALLY KNOW WHAT YOUR LOOKING AT? 

Friday Oct 15

Time: 10:30am-Noon

48 Student Max

FDNY FF Bob Athanas - SAFE-IR, INC

 

All thermal imagers are not created equal. Knowing your thermal imager make and model and its functionality is critical. Thermal Imagers by design provide information that must be interpreted by the operator. Once interpreted, we may apply this information tactically.

 

This session will educate you on important tactical information that a thermal imager may or may not be capable of providing such as the movement of convected heat. We will also discuss limitations and how to recognize them. The NFPA 1801 Standard on Thermal Imagers for the Fire Service and features such as temperature measurement, colorization and more will be explained, as well as, additional applications.

 

Bring your thermal imager questions and experiences and we’ll help you gain a better understanding of what’s important, and what’s not, when utilizing your thermal imager. 

RAPID INTERVENTION.....THINK ABOUT IT 

Friday Oct 15

Time: 3:00pm-4:45pm

48 Student Max

Providence Lt. Brian Belhumeur

 

RIT….Think about it is a discussion oriented class to get the attendees to think about the functions of RIT, build upon them, think outside the box, and to not just “check the box”.

 

We will discuss real world scenarios and expand upon the basics to come up with ideas that are both functional and realistic to help save our own.  

 

RIT functions/tactics and true abilities will be discussed, as will the hard conversations of who and how many should be assigned the important and not so glamorous role as the Rapid Intervention Team.

 

This class diverts from the cookie cutter approach of RIT.  Instead it focuses on the ability to think through an incident from before it happens to when you return to the firehouse.

DEVELOPING THE MINDSET OF OFFENSIVE AERIAL OPERATOR 

Friday Oct 15

Time: 3:00pm-4:45pm

48 Student Max

Bridgeport Capt. Nick Esposito

Success or failure on the fire ground for a ladder company is often measured by how well an aerial operator initially positions the apparatus. Ladder truck placement at an emergency scene is often the "make or break" moment for any operator. The individual skills and abilities of the aerial apparatus operator can dictate how successful a truck company will be in achieving their goals at a fire scene. Aerial apparatus are typically placed to allow members to work offensively in order to affect a rescue, gain entry to the upper floors of a structure, or to access the roof for vertical ventilation operations.

 

These concepts seem pretty simple and straight forward, but often we find that the actual execution at a fire scene can quickly become much more difficult. This class aims to prepare aerial operators to be able to systematically approach an emergency scene in order to achieve an effective apparatus placement that will allow the ladder crew to make a positive impact on the outcome of any emergency.

OVERCOMING COMMON ENGINE COMPANY MISTAKES AND FIREGROUND PROBLEMS 

Friday Oct 15

Time: 3:00pm-4:45pm

48 Student Max

New Haven FF Jason Rivera - Northeast Squad Concepts LLC

A good firefighter or fire officer is not judged solely on his ability to make a good decision at the right time, he is also judged on his ability to correct a mistake or problem when it occurs.  

This program breaks these issues down into two categories: mistakes and problems. Mistakes are man made errors that can be corrected before the fire through experience and proper training.  Problems are unexpected issues that arise and are out of our control but need to get fixed immediately.  

 

Getting the initial attack line in place is without a doubt the most efficient means of bringing a fire under control and has saved more lives than any other tactic. There are many decisions that need to be made when stretching the initial attack line: Size, length, nozzle type, stretch dry or charged? Once these decisions have been made a multitude of unexpected problems can be encountered. In this class we will discuss the most common problems and mistakes engine companies make when stretching the initial attack line and how to overcome these issues.  Whether you are a career firefighter or volunteer; operate in the city, suburbs, or a rural area this class applies to YOU!

FIREFIGHTER STRESS: RISK & REWARD

Friday Oct 15

Time: 3:00pm-4:45pm

48 Student Max

Chicago BC Chief Dan DeGryse

I will describe the physical and mental chain of reactions we experience with our fight/flight/freeze response.  I will identify how our HPA axis sets in motion a series of physiological responses in reaction to stressors that can either aid us or be detrimental to us.  I will discuss how as first responders and years of responding to alarms and dealing with traumatic scenes may lead to overexposure to adrenaline and cortisol which in turn can be harmful to our overall well-being.  Some potential outcomes include heart disease, weight gain, sleep issues, and mental health issues.  I will propose proactive methods to address these concerns.  

 

Related to our persistent, unique job stressors, I will present statistics on PTSD and suicide as well as signs and symptoms of each.  With all that information to consider, I will outline a plan that a fire department can implement to improve both our recognition and approach regarding our physical and mental well-being.

RESCUE TASK FORCE - "A UNIFIED RESPONSE" FOR AN ACTIVE SHOOTER

Friday Oct 15

Time: 3:00pm-4:45pm

48 Student Max

Providence Lt. Jason White & VA Police Sergeant Steven Cileli

Topics covered in this seminar will include: Working effectively in an ever changing hostile environment. Working with police and creating an effective command structure. Scenario based appropriate response, equipment used, tactics, integration and communication, weapons and disarming techniques, ambush survival, scenario based appropriate treatment, and dealing with PD K9s (if time permits). Additionally, we will engage in competitive exercises and discuss tips, techniques and best practices for starting your own Rescue Task Force program.